Is there a vaccine against Lyme disease?

No, there isn't. There was a vaccine, called LYMErix, although it was never approved for young children. The manufacturer pulled it from the market after some controversy about its safety.

Shouldn’t the doctor prescribe antibiotics immediately?

Probably not. Many parents are so worried about Lyme disease that they want their kids to take antibiotics just in case the tick was infected. But the chances of this are slim. What's more, experts aren't sure whether antibiotics will work against Lyme disease during the first few weeks after a bite, before symptoms arise. The overuse of antibiotics poses its own dangers. Germs can become resistant to the drugs, which has become an increasing problem. So most experts recommend a wait-and-see (but watch for ...

Should I worry about Lyme disease when tick bites?

Ticks can carry a variety of germs, including the microbes that cause Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and other diseases such as ehrlichiosis and tularemia. That's why it's important to remove the tick and clean the area as soon as you discover the problem. (Even if the tick is infected, removing it in the first 24 hours greatly reduces the chances that it will transmit Lyme disease.) After you remove a tick, keep an eye on your baby. If he seems ill or develops a rash or fever during the follow...

What should I do if I find a tick on my baby?

Don't panic. Ticks can transmit infection only after they've attached themselves to the skin and drawn blood into their bodies. Even then, they usually need to have been attached for a significant period of time (12 to 48 hours). If you see a tick crawling on your baby's clothing, or it's on his skin and is still small, there's really nothing to worry about. If the tick has attached itself, you should remove it as soon as possible. Forget any advice you've heard about applying petroleum jelly, fingernail po...