LASIK Precautions

The safety and effectiveness of refractive procedures has not been determined in patients with some diseases. Discuss with your doctor if you have a history of any of the following: Herpes simplex or Herpes zoster (shingles) involving the eye area. Glaucoma, glaucoma suspect, or ocular hypertension. Eye diseases, such as uveitis/iritis (inflammations of the eye) Eye injuries or previous eye surgeries. Keratoconus

What is impetigo?

Impetigo is a highly contagious skin infection that happens when staph or strep bacteria enter the skin — through a cut or scrape, for example. It's most common among children between the ages of 2 and 6 years. Impetigo usually isn't dangerous, but it can be itchy and ugly. And complications — like more serious skin infections, scarring, and kidney inflammation — are possible, so it's important to treat impetigo promptly.

What are the ringworm symptoms?

If your baby has ringworm on his body, he'll have one or more scaly patches, probably between the size of a dime and a quarter. While the patches don't always start out round, by the time they're about half an inch across, they usually form a scaly ring around a smooth center. As the fungus grows, the ring gets larger, but it usually stops growing by the time it's about an inch in diameter. The rash can be dry or moist, and it can appear almost anywhere on the body. When the fungus affects the scalp, the ra...

Preventing an asthma attack

Drugs known as controllers are used to prevent asthma attacks. These include inhaled steroids, which can help reduce inflammation and swelling and prevent your baby from wheezing. You would give your baby daily inhaled steroid medicine using either an MDI or a nebulizer, depending on the steroid prescribed by his doctor. If your baby's asthma proves difficult to control, his doctor may refer him to an asthma specialist. You'll want to make sure that any sitters or daycare providers responsible for your baby...

What effect do nasal polyps have on sinus problems?

Nasal polyps are not true polyps but rather are probably caused by inflammation in the nose. They look like peeled grapes but are basically fluid-filled sacs. They can be found anywhere in the sinuses or nose and commonly are associated with sinus infections. They can cause a blockage of the drainage holes (ostia) from the sinuses, causing a back-up of mucus in the sinuses. Nasal polyps are often associated with asthma and can be made worse in some people by ingesting aspirin or related drugs. Treatment inv...

Alternate sinus treatments

Although antibiotics are important to use in treatment of sinus infections, it is extremely important to allow the mucus in the sinuses to drain adequately. The way this is done is to use nasal sprays containing small amounts of cortisone to reduce the inflammation inside the nose and around the ostia (the opening from the sinuses into the nose). (There is minimal absorption of any of the cortisone nasal sprays into the body and so they are very safe). there is a list of the various steroid nasal sprays in ...