Yes. A vaccine has been available since 1995, and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children receive the shot at 12 to 15 months of age, with a second dose at 4 to 6 years.

The vaccine causes few side effects in healthy children and keeps more than 95 percent from getting a serious case of chicken pox. The shot isn't recommended if your child has had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin (yes, the stuff that makes Jell-O hold together), the antibiotic neomycin, or — when she's older — a previous dose of the vaccine.

If your baby has cancer or any disease that affects her immune system, has recently had a blood transfusion, or is taking high doses of oral steroids, her doctor will carefully evaluate whether receiving the vaccine would be a good idea.

See our article on the chicken pox vaccine for more information on the pros and cons of the shot.



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