Will my child always have psoriasis?

Will my child always have psoriasis?Psoriasis tends to be chronic and cyclical, flaring up and settling down, and even going into remission from time to time and then reappearing.In other words, the condition is unpredictable — there's no way to know when an outbreak will hit, how long it will last, or whether the condition might be gone for good.With help from a dermatologist, though, you can help your child through it.

How common is psoriasis?

More than 4.5 million adults in the United States have psoriasis, and about 20 percent of them have moderate to severe cases. It occurs equally in men and women, and a bit more often in Caucasians than African Americans. Psoriasis is rare in Native Americans and uncommon among Asians. You can get psoriasis at any age, but it shows up most often between the ages of 15 and 35. One in ten psoriasis patients develops the condition during childhood, and 75 percent of patients show symptoms before the age of 40. ...

What causes psoriasis?

Most skin cells grow and shed every 28 to 30 days. If your baby has psoriasis, the skin cells in the affected area are maturing every three to four days instead. Those raised, scaly lesions are actually a buildup of skin. The redness is from extra blood being pumped to the area. Nobody knows why the body decides to generate skin cells so rapidly, but the change is thought to be triggered by the immune system. There's a genetic factor, too — about a third of those with psoriasis have at least one family memb...

What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition that shows up in several forms. The two that appear most in children are: • Plaque psoriasis. This is the most common type. If your baby has a raised, red lesion covered with a flaky, silvery-white scale, he may have it. Plaque can show up anywhere, although it most often appears on the elbows, knees, scalp, and lower back. • Guttate psoriasis. This type of psoriasis is more common in children than in adults. It isn't as scaly or thick as plaque. Instead it appear...

What are the possible side effects of chicken pox vaccine?

About 20 percent of children will have some soreness at the site of the injection. About 10 percent will have a low-grade fever. About 4 percent will have a mild rash (around ten chicken pox—like blisters). Fewer than one in a thousand will have a seizure caused by high fever. Though these febrile seizures may seem scary, they're almost always harmless for the child. But you should call your doctor right away if your child has one. Severe allergic reactions are rare but possible with any vaccine. See what o...

Who shouldn’t get the chicken pox vaccine?

A child who has ever had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin (yes, the stuff that's in Jell-O) or the antibiotic neomycin. If he has a severe allergic reaction to his first vaccination, he shouldn't receive a second. If your child has cancer or any disease that affects his immune system, has recently had a blood transfusion, or is taking high doses of oral steroids (for asthma or poison ivy, for instance), his doctor will carefully evaluate whether receiving the vaccine is a good idea.

What are the benefits of the chicken pox vaccine?

It may seem unnecessary, because childhood chicken pox (also known as varicella) is usually a relatively mild illness. And some parents think it's better to let their kids be exposed to chicken pox so they'll have the illness (and the resulting immunity) naturally. But most experts now recommend the chicken pox vaccine, and many schools and daycare centers require it. Here's why: 1) Chicken pox is no party. If your child gets it, he's likely to develop a rash of itchy, painful blisters accompanied by fever ...

How should I treat my baby’s chicken pox?

Keep your baby home from daycare until all the sores have crusted over to prevent her from spreading the disease and to give her time to recuperate. Unfortunately, children are most contagious the day or two before the rash erupts, usually before parents know their child is sick. While your baby's recuperating, the most comforting thing you can do is relieve the itching. Give her a cool bath every three to four hours. Sprinkle baking soda or colloidal oatmeal (made specifically for the bath) into the water ...

Is there any way to prevent chicken pox?

Yes. A vaccine has been available since 1995, and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children receive the shot at 12 to 15 months of age, with a second dose at 4 to 6 years. The vaccine causes few side effects in healthy children and keeps more than 95 percent from getting a serious case of chicken pox. The shot isn't recommended if your child has had a severe allergic reaction to gelatin (yes, the stuff that makes Jell-O hold together), the antibiotic neomycin, or — when she's older —...

Is chicken pox dangerous?

For healthy babies, chicken pox is usually more of a nuisance than a real threat. On rare occasions, though, even healthy children can develop serious complications from chicken pox, like a bacterial skin infection, pneumonia, or encephalitis, a swelling of the brain. If your child has chicken pox, call the doctor if she seems sicker than expected, if she develops a fever after the first few days, if the rash spreads to her eyes, or if the skin around the pox becomes swollen, painful, or very red. If your c...

How did my baby get chicken pox?

Chicken pox is caused by the varicella zoster virus, which passes from person to person with remarkable ease. If your baby has been exposed to the chicken pox, it usually takes 14 to 16 days for the pustules to appear, although they can show up anytime between ten and 21 days. People with chicken pox can pass the virus along by touching someone after touching the blisters or coughing or sneezing onto their hand, or by releasing it into the air whenever they sneeze, cough, or even breathe. The virus can also...

My baby has a spotty red rash all over her chest. Could it be chicken pox?

It could be. Because most babies get antibodies against the virus from their mother while in the womb, it's unusual for a baby to come down with chicken pox during the first year. Those who do tend to have a mild case. Chicken pox, also called varicella, typically causes an itchy rash that starts out as small red bumps. These bumps quickly change into clear, fluid-filled blisters on a pink base, which eventually become dry brown crusts. New waves of blisters often spring up as the illness progresses. The ra...

How can I prevent pinworms?

Keep the pests from infecting — or re-infecting — your baby by taking a few precautions: • Clean your baby's nails with a scrub brush, and keep them short to prevent eggs from becoming trapped underneath. • Bathe him when he wakes up to help eliminate the eggs. • Open bedroom curtains and blinds during the day. (Pinworm eggs are sensitive to sunlight.) • Wash your hands every time you change your baby's diaper. Remember, many children get pinworms. As with lice, the condition is not an indication of poor pa...

How are pinworms treated?

A mild case of pinworms will sometimes go away without any treatment. But a severe infestation can cause complications, like more serious infections, so you don't want to let the situation get worse. If you think your baby may have pinworms, talk with his doctor about treatment. She'll most likely prescribe medication to kill the worms. She'll probably suggest that the whole family be treated, too, since pinworms spread so easily. Symptoms of pinworm infestation usually disappear within one week of treatmen...

How did my baby get pinworms?

It's rare for young babies to get pinworms, but it can happen, especially if your baby goes to daycare or if his siblings have pinworms. Your baby probably swallowed pinworm eggs after he got them on his hands — possibly from touching a toy handled by a child with pinworms — and then put his fingers in his mouth. (The eggs can survive for up to two weeks on some surfaces.) The eggs then traveled to his large intestine, where they hatched. From there, female pinworms migrated out of your child's intestines t...

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