The non drug remedies for sinus infection

Many patients will report that breathing in eucalyptus oils will help open the nose. Steam rooms are also often helpful. Patients often report that after a hot shower their nose seems to open up and they are more comfortable. Some patients also report help with garlic. I have even had some patients who stuffed garlic cloves up their nose!! Chinese herbs have been used, but we cannot endorse these nor do we know of any studies showing they are effective. Irrigation, saline nasal sprays, and other medications...

Alternate sinus treatments

Although antibiotics are important to use in treatment of sinus infections, it is extremely important to allow the mucus in the sinuses to drain adequately. The way this is done is to use nasal sprays containing small amounts of cortisone to reduce the inflammation inside the nose and around the ostia (the opening from the sinuses into the nose). (There is minimal absorption of any of the cortisone nasal sprays into the body and so they are very safe). there is a list of the various steroid nasal sprays in ...

What antibiotics are available for sinus infection ?

Commonly used antibiotics such as penicillin, erythromycin, and tetracycline do not generally work because usually the bacteria are resistant. Antibiotics such as amoxicillin and sulfa drugs may be used as first line treatment for sinus infections, but they commonly do not work in patients who have had infections for more than a short period of time or who have been on multiple antibiotics previously. We then may have to use one of the newer antibiotics - they are expensive, sometimes $100 per week. We comm...

How do I find a doctor to treat my sinus problems?

That is a very difficult question to answer. Assuming that you are not from New York, I would suggest that you go over the information in the website carefully and discuss it with your doctor. You might want to ask him to look at the information in the physicians section, or print it out for him or her. Hopefully you can get them to be receptive to the ideas which I have compiled here. If you feel that you are not getting better, and your doctor is not receptive to trying some of the treatments in here, I w...

Why can’t the cilia move the mucus out?

Typically, early in the development of a sinus infection, the cilia (tiny hairs lining the sinuses) are lost and mucus becomes increasing thick. Consequently, the mucus is retained in the sinus. If the sinus infection lasts for a long enough period of time, the lining of the sinus may actually physically change, causing an even thicker mucus to develop. The bacteria become trapped in all of the nooks and crannies and proliferate. Once this happens, it is common that patients need to have surgery. Given the ...

What causes mucus to be moved out of the sinuses?

There are tiny hairs in the sinuses called cilia. They beat like waves and move mucus out of the sinuses through a tiny hole (actually a short tube). The tube forms a hairpin turn and is only about 1/6 of an inch in diameter. Obviously it is very easy for this to get blocked.

How is sinusitis diagnosed?

It may be extremely difficult to diagnose a sinus infection early in the course of the disease. After taking a careful history, which is extremely valuable in helping diagnose sinusitis, and doing a physical exam, the diagnosis is typically made by looking inside the nose with a flexible rubber or rigid steel tube called an endoscope. Depending on what is found at the time of the endoscopy, an x-ray (CT scan) of your sinuses may need to be done. Previously, x-rays of the sinuses were done. Now CT scans are ...

What causes sinusitis?

Sinusitis starts as a result of blockage of the hole (actually a short hairpin shaped tube) into the sinuses, called an ostium. This blockage can occur as a result of an anatomical obstruction, swelling due to a cold or allergy, drying of the mucus, or a foreign body. When this occurs, mucus that normally is expelled from the sinus builds up in the sinus. This can cause pressure or pain. In addition the mucus is an excellent culture medium for bacteria. If the mucus is not cleared immediately, an abscess ca...

Why do we have sinuses?

The sinuses are air pockets located inside the bones in the skull. They are located to either side of the nose (maxillary), behind and in between the eyes (ethmoid), in the forehead (frontal), and there is one much further back in the head (sphenoid). (For a better understanding of this, please look at the CT scan page when you finish reading this page.) They are probably present to reduce the weight of the skull as well as to create resonance to the voice. The sinuses are lined with very fine hair-like pro...

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